Chekesha Ellis Blog, People Facing Addiction

I am a woman who does not look like what she has been through.

I have yet to meet someone who has gone through what I have.
I’ve always believed that “broken crayons still color”.
I turned my tumultuous past into a great testimony!

I became heavily addicted to prescription painkillers in 2002 after a knee surgery before there was an “Opioid Epidemic”
I had never experimented with drugs ever in my life and quickly fell in love with how painkillers made me feel.
A doctor began prescribing me 100’s of painkillers, and shortly thereafter, my chase for the powerful pills would begin.
My sole goal became to seek as many doctors as I could to get prescriptions for pain pills.
I was very private some of the closest people to me had no idea that I had an addiction.

My life quickly turned upside down, and I lost friends, condos, apartments, vehicles, I sold all my beautiful clothes and jewelry.
I moved back with my parents, they didn’t understand what I was going through.
I would have very bad withdrawals and they just thought I was sick, but didn’t understand that the withdrawals were from me running out of painkillers.

Chekesha EllisFor 11 years I heavily used painkillers. I isolated myself and hid my addiction.
In 2010 I ended my chase for prescription painkillers.
My father whom is a Pastor and my mother, prayed with me, I grew up in a very religious home, and was raised to have faith in God.
Miraculously in August of 2010, I got stopped cold turkey, and have been free since.

In 2014 I became a public figure when my story was published on the front page of a newspaper.
In the beginning, I was very scared, embarrassed and paranoid about my story making the front page of the newspaper.
Yet my healing grew the more I began sharing my story.
I believe that this journey is not one, that one can tackle without having FAITH and believing in a higher being.

Chekesha Ellis & PoliceI am now a Recovery Mentor becoming a licensed Interventionist.
I personally help people struggling with addiction, and have helped many individuals get into detox centers, and rehabilitation centers and providing support for their families.
I give them hope, because I’m living proof, that if you want your life back you can have it! You have to take one day at a time.
It’s not a walk in the park, and everything I went through was worth being able to save lives now.
I’m a community activist, who has worked with police departments going out into the schools and the community to share my story.
This is my passion.

One of the most important lessons that I’ve learned throughout my journey is “Not to STEREOTYPE People”, because I was addicted in silence for over a decade, and because I looked so wonderful on the outside, people never saw my cries for help, people very close to me couldn’t discern how heavy my heart was, how sad, lonely, and depressed I was.
I was near death, and when I came out on the other side, I learned that people are fighting for their lives, but don’t even look like it!
Never judge a book by its cover.

This opioid epidemic has turned into a pandemic, and it will only get worse, many more lives will be lost.
My wish list consists of doctors and Pharmaceutical companies being held responsible and held accountable for prescribing mass amounts of opioids.
Thank you for reading.