Incarceration is not a substitute for substance treatment, but many people who are in jail or prison need help with substance use disorder. Addiction in the criminal justice system is a mostly unaddressed problem that keeps hundreds of thousands of people sick—and has long-term costs for both inmates and taxpayers. Although some think that people with substance use disorder can easily get “cleaned up” behind bars, the reality of …
Claire Foster Blog

Choose Your Reward

Stress related cravings for alcohol may predict addictive patterns. How do you unwind at the end of a long, difficult day? Do you grab a bowl of ice cream, shoot hoops at the park, or meditate your stress away? Or do you reach for an alcoholic drink? The way you reward yourself could mean you’re more likely to develop substance use disorder, according to a new study from Sweden …
Substance use disorder is a mental health issue. Although public policy largely focuses on separating people from addictive substances, the disorder begins “between your ears.” Facing addiction means changing the factors that create demand for substances, not just eliminating the substances themselves. In a recent op-ed at The Hill, Lynn R. Webster, MD pointed out that lack of secure attachment or stable relationships could lead …
Claire Foster Blog
Substance use disorder is complex issue that affects people in different ways. However, some factors, such as traumatic experiences or genetic predisposition can influence whether or not someone will become addicted. There’s another major influencer as well: relationships. Women are more likely to develop substance use disorder when they’re in relationships with men who are already addicted. According to Gulf News, women often find that substance use is …
Claire Foster Blog
Understanding how our brains work provides valuable insights into how addiction works, and how to treat it. A new study, published in Science Translational Medicine, suggests an interesting connection between opioid use and a neurotransmitter that regulates sleep. By manipulating hypocretin-producing cells in the brain. Although the paper focused on narcolepsy, it actually studied two neurotransmitters related to the sleep and satisfaction systems of the …
Healthcare providers face new challenges in improving medical care for people with substance use disorder. This can be as simple as prescribing certain medications to people in recovery from opioid use disorder and ensuring continuity of care for someone exiting treatment. As more people seek help, it’s clear that we need a coordinated, integrated approaches to care to help patients succeed. Yet, at the same time, compromising confidentiality might put people at risk.
Claire Foster Blog
My name is Amber and I’m a person in recovery. I was 13 years old when I became addicted. I’ve always been the black sheep of my family. I felt like an outcast growing up and still sometimes do, when it comes to the way certain family members treat me. They don’t understand that addiction is not a choice. Nobody wants to be an “addict.” Addiction runs deep in my family.

Medical Records for Addiction: To Integrate or Segregate?

Healthcare providers face new challenges in improving medical care for people with substance use disorder. This can be as simple as prescribing certain medications to people in recovery from opioid use disorder and ensuring continuity of care for someone exiting treatment. As more people seek help, it’s clear that we need a coordinated, integrated approaches to care to help patients succeed. Yet, at the same time, compromising confidentiality might put people at risk.
This month’s Partners Facing Addiction post features a youth education prevention group in Maryland, a women’s recovery program in San Francisco, a recovery foundation in Georgia, and a recovery community-based in New Mexico. If you’d like your organization to be considered for an upcoming Partners Facing Addiction post, answer a few short questions here. Arise & Flourish, Inc. Arise & Flourish, Inc. is a group in Montgomery …
My journey with addiction started well before I ever put a substance into my body. When I was about 5 years old, my parents started using in front of me, openly. My father used to wake me up at all hours of the night and make me hitchhike miles and miles with him so he could smoke crack. He said he would get a ride faster because I was with him, …